Tuesday, October 17, 2017

THE ART OF THE SEQUEL

guest post by Huntly Rinck

Lynn here: Since Huntly is part of the High Plains Register team at Laramie County Community College, I don't think he'll mind if I jump in here and let you know that the deadline for submissions of previously unpublished, original poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction, drama, music and artwork to this fine literary magazine has been extended to December 15th. Visit their website for more information.

Okay, enough of that. On to Huntly's post...



Sequels are evil!

They are insidious in the way that they’ve wormed their way into our culture. It’s rare to visit a multiplex without at least one of the offerings having a number following the title. At least when we, as writers, create sequels of our short stories or novels, we try to label them with actual titles instead of just appending a number.

Sequels themselves can be good – most people enjoyed Marvel’s Guardians of the Galaxy, volume 2 as much as the original. But they can be bad. 1997’s Batman and Robin killed the successful franchise for almost a decade. (I do differentiate between books or movies with one or several sequels, and books and movies that were planned to be a series.)

My problem with sequels is that they’re usually written for the wrong reason. There are a lot of wrong reasons to write a sequel:
  • For the money – someone’s willing to pay for it (or at least the author thinks so). Most movie sequels, especially the bad ones fall into this category. 
  • For the characters – the author wants to revisit some favorite characters (or his fans want him to). Lillian Jackson Braun’s popular Cat Who series falls into this category – later entries in the series lacked plot, but were enjoyable visits with the familiar characters, both human and feline. 
  • Laziness – the author just doesn’t want to create new characters or settings.
There is only one good reason to write a sequel: you have more story to tell.


So as an author, you have a duty to your readers to ask yourself if the story you’re going to tell in your proposed sequel can stand up. Is the story, by itself, worth your reader’s time and effort? Is it worth your time and effort?

One good test is to ask yourself: which came first, the idea of writing a sequel, or the story idea?


If you do have that story to tell, the one in your head burning to get out, then start writing and good luck.

In the interests of full disclosure, I wrote an internet novel that eventually had seven sequels. But in my defense, I claim that it was all an unplanned series. I started writing a short story that grew up into a novel-length story. When I posted it, I almost immediately got feedback asking when the sequel would be out, and I emphatically denied that there would be a sequel, after all. Sequels are evil.

But the characters wouldn’t evacuate my head to make room for others, they had more to say. After I posted the sequel, I got more feedback asking about the next sequel. I replied that the sequel was a fluke and there wouldn’t be another. Sequels are evil.

Then I woke up after a dream, and rushed to my computer. My characters had more to say. After posting the third book, I stopped telling readers that there wouldn’t be sequels.




Huntly Rinck has been writing for almost half a century and is still learning the craft. He started submitting his work to magazines at age fourteen, though no one was interested. He sold a number of shorts in the seventies and eighties before turning to novels. 

His novel, Cartwheels, is available on Amazon.

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